2021 Titleist T100 irons vs T200 Irons Comparison

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Thanks for checking out Golfer Geeks’ comparison of 2021 Titleist T100 irons vs T200 Irons.

I’m an avid golfer, 8ish handicap on my way to a 2 (been a 5.6), and frequent tester of golf clubs and equipment since 2015.  

I had the 2021 T100s and T200s for 2 weeks. I played 27 holes with the T100 irons and 18 holes with the T200 irons. I got a little work on my golf mat and a little more at the range. My best testing came on the course for a round with each.

Summary: The T100 irons are classic player cavity backs and deliver any shot you want, have good distance, and a splash of forgiveness. The T200 are player distance irons that deliver any shot you want, have more distance and more forgiveness.

In this comparison of the Taylormade P7MB and Taylormade P7MC Irons, I discuss my experience with the clubs, unique features and benefits, and my pick for which iron set I’d buy.

2021 Titleist T100 irons

Set Tested – 4-PW, Standard Lie, Right Hand
Shaft: True Temper Dynamic Gold S400 Steel Stiff Flex

I’ve played a lot of great player irons that I recommend and would happily own. But the 2021 T100 irons are the standard in low-handicap cavity back irons.

I love the fact that they’re refined enough for touring pros and are playable by good single-digit ball strikers.

They have world-class premium looks. They don’t require perfect contact (but they do reward it) for great results. They feel and sound great. And, they’re the type of clubs you’ll keep around for a while.

I didn’t have my best stuff during my time with them. But, I had good enough stuff and hit a few very nice shots that kept (keep) me wanting more.

2021 Titleist T100 Irons Specs

ClubLoftLie AngleLength
424*61.5*38.5″
527*62*38″
630*62.5*37.5″
734*63*37″
838*63.5*36.5″
942*64*36″
PW46*64*35.5″

2021 Titleist T200 irons

2021 Titleist T200 Irons 1st round on the course

Set Tested – 4-PW, Standard Lie, Right Hand
Shaft: True Temper AMT Red Steel S300 Stiff Flex

The 2021 T200s sang for me on the course – not so much on the range. To be fair to them, I’m not doing great work on the range because I haven’t put the work in.

The T200s I tested in 2019 were game improvement irons aimed at mid handicaps. These T200s are player distance irons.

This struck me when I first pulled them out of the box. The heads are compact, not far from the T100s I tested at the same time. They’ve got a thicker topline and sole, stronger lofts, and more offset to add some game-improvement features.

They look great at address, deliver a powerful ball flight, and feel great while doing it.

My round with the T200 irons couldn’t have been better.

Titleist T200 irons Specs

ClubLoftLie AngleLength
422*61.5*38.5″
525*62*38″
628*62.5*37.5″
731*63*37″
835*63.5*36.5″
939*64*36″
PW43*64*35.5″

Testing the Titleist 2021 T100 & T200 Irons

Practically all of my testing came on the course for both sets.

TLDR – Both sets are awesome but the T200s are more forgiving and longer and the T100s are more workable.

Three 9-hole rounds with the T100 irons.
One 18-hole round with the T200 irons. (My swing was on and I flushed the ball. I learned what I needed to know.)

I played my first 9-hole round with the T100 irons. My swing was erratic, but I managed to pull off a couple of good shots.

My first chance to hit the T100s came on the 2nd hole – a par 5. I laid up with the 8-iron to about 126 yards from the pin. Not a really solid shot. I hit it a little toward the toe and maybe a little chunky. Still, it went 150ish and ended up in a great spot for my shot into the green.

I pulled the T100 pitching wedge for the next shot (126 yards to the pin). The ball was a little above my feet and was sitting nicely in the fairway. I flushed it with a nice high tight draw, but I pulled it about 8 yards and it finished pin high left of the green, a few inches in the rough.

The next shot was an uphill par 3 about 168 yards to the pin. I pulled the 7-iron and mishit it toward the toe and a little fat…again. The ball landed on the front left part of the green – the pin was back center.

This next shot is probably my favorite of this round. I was in the middle of the fairway on the next hole – a par 4. It was a downhill lie with mostly dirt underneath the ball. A miss left puts me down a steep embankment with a bare lie.

The entrance to the green is on the right. I was 158 yards from the pin, which was in front. I chose to hit a punch draw as there is a run-up area and because I wanted to avoid a left miss.

I pulled it off. I flushed it on my line on a medium-low trajectory with a 3 to 5 yard draw. I finished a couple of yards past pin high about 5 yards right of the pin.

The rest of the round featured more missed shots than good shots. But I did manage one more punch shot similar to the one I just described.

I knew I’d need to get the T100s back on the course.

I played the next round the next day – a different story.

I had better command of my swing and made solid crisp contact and got my high tight draw I like to see.

My dispersion improved and pitching wedge to 4-iron. I kept the ball in front of me and I had a chance to score on every hole.

Conclusion – They deliver best when your swing is on (of course), but they will cover for you when you’re slightly off. Your swing needs to be on more than it’s off.

Then I played 18 holes the next day with the T200 irons. I need reps to play better and I had high hopes for the T200s based on my ball striking the day before with the T100 irons.

Boy, was I in for a treat? 1st hole from the middle of the fairway into a one-club wind, I pulled the pitching wedge (43 degrees). I got steep on it, but ended up just short of pin high on the green. So, marginal contact with a more-than-acceptable result. Exactly what these clubs are meant for.

The next hole is a par 5. I had a semi-layup situation. I don’t often go for greens on par 5s because I’m not good with long irons or fairway woods.

But, I’m testing clubs. So, I pulled the 5-iron. Again, I was into the wind and had to clear a bunker – about 183 yards.

I absolutely flushed the 5-iron. High and arrow straight. I cleared the bunker easily and ended up just short of the green. I could not have hit a 5-iron better.

The next hole is an uphill par 3. About 200 yards and uphill about 5-7 yards. I pulled the 4-iron. And, proceeded to mishit it toward the toe and a smidge fat. Still, I finished less than a yard off the front of the green.

Another example of the club filling in for my crap contact.

I flushed quite a few short, mid, and long irons after that. A delightful ball-striking day for me.

Conclusion – If you’re a good ball striker who sometimes needs help, the T200 irons are that help.

Are there big differences between T100 & T200 Irons?

No, not great big differences but differences. At least in my experience with my skill level. I got into it below.

Looks

The T100 irons are up there with the best-looking premium low-handicap cavity back irons on the market. I could be convinced they’re the best. The brushed metal finish is my favorite. I’m a fan of their elegant minimalist design.

The T200s are good-looking irons on their own. I love the compact head. The thicker topline and sole don’t jump out at me. I dig the minimal and sleek design. They have the high-shine finish which isn’t my favorite, but I don’t hate it.

Winner – T100 irons

Sound/Feel

They both feel and sound great with solid contact. But, the T100s are pure class and have the edge.

Winner – T100 irons

Playability/Ball Flight/Accuracy

Both sets deliver high-piercing trajectories on solid shots. They both can be worked and they both can be flighted. The T100 irons are built to be and are more workable and flightable.

Winner – T100 irons

Forgiveness

Gotta go with the T200 irons. But, the T100 irons are no slouch for premium tour and low handicap irons.

Winner – T200 irons

Distance

The T200s are longer.

Winner – T200 irons

Value

~$185/club for the T100s
~$178/club for the MCs
– Both in line with their target market.

Winner – Draw

Verdict on the 2021 Titleist T100 irons vs T200 Irons

Want more workability and need less forgiveness and help with distance?
It’s the T100 irons for you.

Wan’t player irons with player characteristics but need a little more forgiveness and help with distance?
It’s the T200 irons for you.

Which set would I get? My heart says the T100s but my brain says I should probably pick the T200s. (with my game in its current state)

What should you do? See below

My #1 suggestion is to test both sets before you buy. Either at your local golf store or take advantage of Global Golf’s Utry trial program. I use it and recommend it. 

Thanks for checking out my comparison of the 2021 Titleist T100 irons vs T200 Irons

Highly Recommended
Highly Recommended
~$185/club
~$178/club
Pros:
  • Exceptional Feel
  • Accurate & Consistent
  • Great Launch & Trajectory
  • Player Looks & Profile
Pros:
  • Compact Heads & Player Look
  • Long & Forgiving w/ superb feel
  • Easy to elevate w/ long carry
  • Consistent & Accurate
Cons:
  • Zilch
Cons:
  • Nada
Description:
Description:
Highly Recommended
~$185/club
Pros:
  • Exceptional Feel
  • Accurate & Consistent
  • Great Launch & Trajectory
  • Player Looks & Profile
Cons:
  • Zilch
Description:
Highly Recommended
~$178/club
Pros:
  • Compact Heads & Player Look
  • Long & Forgiving w/ superb feel
  • Easy to elevate w/ long carry
  • Consistent & Accurate
Cons:
  • Nada
Description:
Photo of author
AUTHOR
I'm an avid golfer of 30 years, an 8ish handicap on my way to a 2 (been a 5.6), and frequent tester of golf clubs and equipment since 2015.

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